The Flawed Nature of Juries

Featured image: Chicago residents protest the Chicago Police Department as a result of their involvement in the death of Laquan McDonald.

Tuesday, 16 October 2018, Chicago, IL – In October 2014, a 17-year old black teenager named Laquan McDonald was shot 16 times by Jason Van Dyke, a white Chicago police officer. A graphic dash-cam video released one year after the shooting documented the incident. McDonald was walking down a busy road, holding a knife. As he turned away from the police cars, Van Dyke shot and killed him, seemingly for no reason.

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Nelson Mandela

Featured Image: To commemorate Nelson Mandela’s death, the South African flag flew half-mast outside Drakenstein Correctional Centre, where Mandela was imprisoned from 1988 to 1990.

Friday, 22 July 2018, Johannesburg, South Africa – 100 years and 4 days ago, Rolihlahla Mandela was born in Mvezo, a small village in the Eastern Cape region of South Africa. Disillusioned by the unrelenting racism of his country’s government, he stood up not only for himself, but for the entire black majority of South Africa, fighting against the white minority government for a democratic, egalitarian future. The government attempted to suppress him, famously sentencing Mandela to a life prison sentence for treason and sabotage.

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Hong Kong

Featured Image: The Handover ceremony on 1 July 1997 marked the end of British Rule and the return of Hong Kong to China. From 2003 onwards, there have been pro-democracy protests every year on the anniversary of the handover.

1 July 2018, San Francisco, CA – This is the first time we’ve actually been on time for an anniversary. Beginning in the evening on 30 June and ending on 1 July 1997, at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre in Wan Chai, British and Chinese authorities gathered for a handover ceremony. Many things happened at the convention centre that night, but the key event was the lowering of the Union Jack and Hong Kong Ensign to “God Save the Queen”, followed by the raising of the Chinese flag and new Hong Kong flag to “March of the Volunteers”, the Chinese National Anthem. The lowering of the Union Jack and Hong Kong ensign symbolically marked the end of British rule in Hong Kong, and by extension, the end of the British Empire. But why was Hong Kong even a part of Britain in the first place?

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Peace in the Korean Peninsula

Featured Image: Kim Jong Un of North Korea and Moon Jae In of South Korea meet during one of several impromptu summits between the two countries.

Monday, 28 May 2018, Shanghai, China – Relations between the United States and North Korea have never been very warm. The Korean War has not ended since it began in the 1950’s, the United States has placed major economic sanctions against North Korea, and there aren’t even any diplomatic relations between the two countries. But against all the odds, a summit between the two countries has been planned for June 2018, which is anticipated not only to ease tensions, but could even pave the way for an end to the Korean War and unification of the Korean Peninsula. All of this sounds incredibly exciting, but before we can understand how important Korean peace is, we must understand how it even got this way in the first place.

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Berlin Wall

Featured Image: Berliners atop the Berlin Wall shortly before its demolition

Sunday, 4 March 2018, Berlin, Germany – We are pleased to announce that this is the first nonfiction article of DC Blogs (we said we were going to write some nonfiction articles in our About section). So far, we’ve been just doing short stories. But for no particular reason, we decided to write about the Berlin Wall, making this our first nonfiction article. We will be addressing a common misconception about the Berlin Wall as well as the complex history of the divide between the Eastern and Western Blocs. Let’s get started.

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