How Hawaii became American

Featured Image: Mountains of Kauai

Saturday, 30 March 2019, San Francisco, CA – From kingdom, to republic, to territory, to state, the history of Hawaii is complex, and often fraught with outright stupidity that, in a perfect world, should not have even happened in the first place. We often think of that stupidity as being the annexation of Hawaii by the United States. A historical event described as awkward at best and genocide at worst, most of us think of Hawaii’s annexation as something that, under ideal circumstances, should not have even happened at all. But this post is not just about the annexation. The suffering of the Native Hawaiians from the 19th century onwards was not just caused by the United States. It was also, in part, a self inflicted wound.

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Habsburg Incest

Featured Image: Do you notice anything unusual about Charles’s family tree?

Saturday, 23 February 2019, Paris, France – The Habsburg Dynasty was one of the most influential royal houses in European history, originating in Austria and spreading to almost every European country. The Habsburgs may have been successful in achieving power and influence, but their one key failure is well-known: inbreeding. After hundreds of years, the Habsburg gene pool became progressively smaller and smaller until the royal line was eventually unsustainable. This is the story of Charles II of Spain, and even today is known within Spain as El Hechizado, or “the Bewitched”.

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Australia Day

Featured Image: Australia Day is supposed to represent all Australians, but controversy still lingers over its symbolisation of the struggle of the country’s Aboriginal peoples.

Saturday, 26 January 2019, Sydney, Australia – Today is Australia Day, Australia’s equivalent of America’s Fourth of July. On this day the Australian Government’s official celebrations include citizenship ceremonies, awards and knighthoods, and a controversial re-enactment of the arrival of the First Fleet. Indeed, Australia Day commemorates the anniversary of the arrival of British ships in Australia on 26 January 1788, to claim British sovereignty over the country’s eastern coast. And this simple fact has generated enormous controversy surrounding the discrimination, subjugation, and near-extermination of Australia’s indigenous peoples.

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Elizabeth II: 65 years of history

Featured image: A young Elizabeth; her husband, the Duke of Edinburgh; and her children on the balcony of Buckingham Palace

Friday, 9 June 2018, London, UK – 65 years and 1 week ago, a new British monarch was crowned (we’re not great at keeping up with anniversaries). Her name was Elizabeth II, and her coronation marked a turning point in British history. She was lauded as a symbol of a new era following the enormous destruction of World War II. She was young, fresh, and a symbol of hope for the future. 65 years later, it is unbelievable to think that the monarch who oversaw the decolonisation of the British Empire and the monarch that is still reigning today is the same person. She acceded the throne when she was 26 years old and today she is over 90 years old. In honour of this anniversary, we decided to delve into the Queen’s life, and the enormous change that she has seen, both in Britain and abroad, during the course of her reign.

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Peace in the Korean Peninsula

Featured Image: Kim Jong Un of North Korea and Moon Jae In of South Korea meet during one of several impromptu summits between the two countries.

Monday, 28 May 2018, Shanghai, China – Relations between the United States and North Korea have never been very warm. The Korean War has not ended since it began in the 1950’s, the United States has placed major economic sanctions against North Korea, and there aren’t even any diplomatic relations between the two countries. But against all the odds, a summit between the two countries has been planned for June 2018, which is anticipated not only to ease tensions, but could even pave the way for an end to the Korean War and unification of the Korean Peninsula. All of this sounds incredibly exciting, but before we can understand how important Korean peace is, we must understand how it even got this way in the first place.

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Chernobyl Disaster, 32 years on

Featured image: The abandoned city of Pripyat, with the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant visible in the distance.

Sunday, 29 April 2018, Moscow, Russia – 32 years ago, on 26 April 1986, the worst nuclear disaster in human history occurred, at Reactor 4 of the Chernobyl power plant in the Ukrainian SSR. The disaster resulted in the immediate deaths of 50 scientists, the evacuation of around 120,000 people, and the radioactive contamination of the surrounding area for at least the next 100,000 years.

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Berlin Wall

Featured Image: Berliners atop the Berlin Wall shortly before its demolition

Sunday, 4 March 2018, Berlin, Germany – We are pleased to announce that this is the first nonfiction article of DC Blogs (we said we were going to write some nonfiction articles in our About section). So far, we’ve been just doing short stories. But for no particular reason, we decided to write about the Berlin Wall, making this our first nonfiction article. We will be addressing a common misconception about the Berlin Wall as well as the complex history of the divide between the Eastern and Western Blocs. Let’s get started.

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